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20121222
20121230
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
of religion and the right to practice how we choose. and according to some of this year's recent polls, nearly 60% of the general public finding religion very important in their life. you can look at this poll here on your screen. and our next guest has spent some time reflecting both about faith and politics. fox news contributor juan williams is with us from dc with his analysis. good morning to you. >> good morning, ainsley. merry christmas. >> ainsley: merry christmas to you. so i recently was watching one of the morning shows and i saw joel osteen, the pastor from texas, being interviewed by a local morning anchor and he was asking about his faith and he said -- and then about politics. and he said i try not to talk about politics because it divides people. but you, juan, you have a way -- i know you're very faithful, but you also talk about politics and it's injure job. so how do you set faith into -- fit faith into politics? >> for the whole of america and american politics, religion is oftentimes been i think a centerpoint and not always positive, which is why i hesitated and some pol
nihilism or atheism. the first amendment, congress shall make no law to establish religion or their free exercise thereof. in other words, stay out of it. obviously it assumes -- and there is god. we knew what the religions were. the baptist conventions, they weren't like worshiping a pope. they believed in god. i'm not going to revise history. i grew up in a religious environment and i'm proud of it. i am proud of it but i thank god i believe in god or i would probably be enormously angry right now. so they i am grateful and unapologetic. >> one interesting sort of -- it is remarkable when we started talking a little bit about how the sub by this change over time and we could have could've also edit the 19th amendment, women becoming part of this ever greater ark of democratic inclusion. >> and prohibition. i will drink to that. [laughter] >> but that was repealed. in general most of the amendments, as you said before, maybe more perfect. >> or less perfect perk is. >> but then we got rid of it. >> i don't drink so i understand. [laughter] >> on revision is pretty extraordinary, the con
. they should be able to train without having religion forced on them. joining me with reaction is executive director for the dr. ron cruise who is a retired army chaplain. good morning to you, sir. >> thank you for having me. >> gretchen: we see a situation in west point. one cadet who was an athiest felt uncomfortable with taking part in involuntary prayer, your reaction. >> it is a shame we don't respect the pluralism. can prayer in west point went back from the founding of our country and we need to respect the religious beliefs of all. those who believe and those who don'tment those who believe have every right to prayer and those who don't believe opt out of the prayer. we need to remember that our founding fathers, george washington upon his appointment as commander-in-chief in the army. one of his first acts was to ask congress to authorize chaplains in every brigade so that religious services could be held. prayer is fundament will in the lives of our soldiers from the beginning of our country and west point would do well to resist efforts by athleast advocates. >> i read a portion
in our nation's military without having religion forced upon them. academy officials must respect the religious liberty rights of all cadets who should be free to make their own decisions about prayer without government could ercion. >> what is your reaction to their complaint? >> they've attacked the military several times and an anti-christian organization. that has been their pattern. secondly, there is no coercion, but what mr. lynn is trying to do is attack the last bastion of traditional american values and many of those values came out of christianity and the whole idea of prayer within the military as a whole, but west point specifically, i think, is something that mr. lynn wants to destroy that tradition because of the influence of christianity in our military, as well as in our society. >> dave: is religion ever forced on cadets at west point? >> absolutely not, nor anywhere else in the military. and if mr. lynn would spend the time to understand the first amendment and the -- how the first amendment was written, what it was intended to do, it was actually intended to pr
is asking the u.s. military academy to stop including prayer at all official>> joinin religion contributor father jonathan morris. >> happy sunday. >> kelly: an issue, and let me give awe statement what they're actually saying. they're saying and pull that up quickly, west point cadets should be able to train for service in our nation's military without having religion forced upon them. academy officials must respect the religious liberty rights of all cadets who should be free to make their own decisions about prayer without government coercion. this has been a practice at west point since george washington. >> i'm absolutely in favor of cadets not having to go under government coercion to pray. you don't have to pray. in fact, 1972, there was a court ruling saying that cadets were not-- should not be required to attend religious services, that's a very good court decision. a very different thing to say however, that no one is allowed to pray publicly at an event there at west point. i use today lead a bible study at west point. i know how religious so many of those cadets are and for th
michelle obama shows children the white house holiday decorations, then george will talks about religion and politics. later, james taylor from a recent appearance at the national press club. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i'm a big decision and broke with the democratic party, and went to work for john lindsay. i went
and whatever. i thought every family thought about religion and politics every night. what brought me to it is exactly what you hear the other women here talking about. i was an advocate. i started a nonprofit social- service agency. i did teach politics and history, so i kept the interest going, but it was really katrina that put me down this path. i came back and said, we can do better than this. that is what started it. a passion for change and to be an advocate. table share that. >> i hear you all talk about service -- when i was a girl, my mother was politically active, she went into the new hampshire legislative when i was 12. she would pile everybody in the station wagon and take us to a neighborhood and drop the kids off. we would run down going door- to-door with the leaflets. then she would pick us up at the other end and take us to the next three. but at the end of the day we got an ice-cream cone, so it was all worth it. [laughter] >> all of us had strong mothers. that is what we are hearing here. my mother was my hero come too. i think that is really important for us to u
. we studied the great religions of the world. we studied for.her martin luther king junior was all about and we were ready and we would be sitting in her standing in at a theater or going on a freedom ride and we would be beaten, we would be jailed. but we didn't strike back. we had it as a way of living, in way of life, that it's better to love into hate. we wanted to build a community. we wanted to be reconciled. so this book is also about reconciliation. to give you one example, i first came to washington d.c. they first come in 1861 to go on something called a freedom ride. 18 of us, seven right and six african-americans came here may 1st. we participated in nonviolent workshops and i will never forget him the night of may 3rd, someplace in downtown washington, we went to a chinese restaurant. growing up in rural alabama, going to school in nashville i'd never been to a chinese restaurant before. never had a meal at a chinese restaurant. but at night we had a wonderful meal. food was good and someone said, you should eat while because this may be like the last supper. the next
. 6:30 p.m. we stayed up. what he accomplished in india. civil disobedience. the great religions of the world . dr. martin luther king jr. we were ready. we would be sitting in, standing at theater are going out freedom ride. we would be beaten. we would be jailed. but we didn't strike back. non-violence as a way of living, as a way of life. better to love them to hate. reconciliation. one example. i first came to washington d.c. may 1st 1961. .. food was good. and someone said, should be above because this may be like the last supper. the next day, may 4, 1961, we left washing 10, traveling from here on our way to new orleans. the first incident occurred in charlotte, north carolina. back in 1961, black people in way people could be seated together on a greyhound bus. couldn't share the same waiting room, the same restroom facilities. segregation was the order of the day. in charlotte, north carolina in may 1961, young african-american man entered a so-called weight waiting room. he went into the waiting room and later into the barbershop and tried to get shoe shine. he was arre
should extend discrimination law, or you should protect the free exercise of religion to the greatest extent possible? we would get these cases and resolve them in terms of a particular liberal or conservative political agenda. there are ways of characterizing us that make more sense in terms of what we do. some of my colleagues prefer to adhere strictly to that text of the statute. others of my colleagues look more expensively to what we call the legislative history of the background of the statute, or a purpose, and it makes sense to refer to them in those terms. some of those think it is important what the framers of the constitution were thinking about at the founding when they drafted it. others on the court take a more flexible view and think that the interpretation of the constitution should be informed by evolutionary developments. those sorts of things make sense. it is easier, i think, for court reporters to say that justice is liberal and that justice is conservative, and i do not think it is helpful in looking at what we do. >> let me switch to a question about -- more int
carried the signs and whatever. i thought every family thought about religion and politics every night. what brought me to it is exactly what you hear the other women here talking about. i was an advocate. i started a nonprofit social- service agency. i did teach politics and history, so i kept the interest going, but it was really katrina that put me down this path. i came back and said, we can do better than this. that is what started it. a passion for change and to be an advocate. i think all the people at this table share that. >> i hear you all talk about service -- when i was a girl, my mother was politically active, she went into the new hampshire legislative when i was 12. she would pile everybody in the station wagon and take us to a neighborhood and drop the kids off. we would run down going door-to- door with the leaflets. then she would pick us up at the other end and take us to the next three. but at the end of the day we got an ice-cream cone, so it was all worth it. [laughter] >> all of us had strong mothers. that is what we are hearing here. my mother was my hero come t
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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